Immigrant Youth

Youth under age eighteen residing in the United States who were not U.S. citizens at birth.

Population:

  • In 2016, more than 17 million immigrant lived in the U.S.
  • By 2050 immigrant youth are projected to make up 1/3 (33M) of more than 100 million U.S. youth.
  • Immigrants are an important part of US international competitiveness, especially in technology-intensive and service industries

National Trends:

Actually immigrants tend to be in the labor force at rates higher than the U.S. population, as most who enter the United States are of working age (MPI, 2016). 

“The demographic changes pose a challenge to develop the next generation’s workforce. Risk factors such as poverty and high rates of mobility are higher among immigrant children, as is the need for extra literacy and language support… these risk factors such as student mobility and a lack of key pre-literacy skills often form roots of bigger academic problems that can be curbed if children receive appropriate support during their early years.” By improving education strategies for immigrant children poverty cycles can be disrupted and build a robust future workforce (Severns).

Severns, M. (2011).“Why Ignoring the Immigrant Youth Population Is a Mistake”. New America.

Research shows that immigrants are an important part of the United States international competitiveness, especially in technology-intensive and service industries (US Department of Treasury). They also contribute and will continue enriching the American culture.

Co- Chairs 

Xiomara N Diaz-Vargas
xdiazvar@purdue.edu

Mitchell Mason
mitchell.mason@maine.edu